Search and Rescue

This is a comprehensive 40 hour course on SAR mantracking.  Mantracking on SAR missions is done under an overarching response plan designed by the Incident Commander, also known in ICS terms as the Incident Action Plan (IAP).  Trackers need to learn within the bigger picture and within the context of the current mission and those to follow.  You cannot train tracking in a vacuum.  Training in context is where TTOS has excelled and the military, homeland security and state and local law enforcement proves our process time and time again in real-world successes.

Our SAR Mantracking course begins with the basics: the dynamics of a single footprint.  From that anchor point, students are introduced to micro tracking, also known as step-by-step tracking.  Students will learn step-by-step tracking first and be expected to demonstrate an understanding of it in practical exercises on the end of the first day.  Step-by-step tracking is not difficult to learn.  By use of a tracking stick (AKA a logic stick because you are relying on the external focus of using the tool rather than your own reasoning and observation capabilities) you will locate and identify sign and spoor left behind by the person being tracked.

This is a comprehensive 40 hour course on SAR mantracking.  Mantracking on SAR missions is done under an overarching response plan designed by the Incident Commander, also known in ICS terms as the Incident Action Plan (IAP).  Trackers need to learn within the bigger picture and within the context of the current mission and those to follow.  You cannot train tracking in a vacuum.  Training in context is where TTOS has excelled and the military, homeland security and state and local law enforcement proves our process time and time again in real-world successes.

Our SAR Mantracking course begins with the basics: the dynamics of a single footprint.  From that anchor point, students are introduced to micro tracking, also known as step-by-step tracking.  Students will learn step-by-step tracking first and be expected to demonstrate an understanding of it in practical exercises on the end of the first day.  Step-by-step tracking is not difficult to learn.  By use of a tracking stick (AKA a logic stick because you are relying on the external focus of using the tool rather than your own reasoning and observation capabilities) you will locate and identify sign and spoor left behind by the person being tracked.